Abraham Ten Broeck

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This fair-quality copy of an un-attributed and undated portrait of Abraham Ten Broeck hangs at the Ten Broeck Mansion in Albany. They seek defining information on this legendary image.

Abraham Ten Broeck (May 13, 1734 – January 19, 1810) was a New York politician, businessman, and militia Brigadier general of Dutch descent. He was twice Mayor of Albany, New York and built one of the largest mansions in the area that still stands more than 200 years later.

Early life

Abraham Ten Broeck was the son of Dirck Ten Broeck (1686–1751) and Margarita (née Cuyler) (1682–1783). He was the brother of Catharine Ten Broeck Livingston (1715–1802), who was married to John Livingston (1709–1791), a son of Robert Livingston the Younger, Anna Ten Broeck (1717–1731), and Christina Ten Broeck Livingston (1718–1801), who was married to Philip Livingston (1716–1778).

His father was a prominent merchant and politician who served as Albany's mayor beginning in 1746. His paternal grandfather Wessel Ten Broeck (1664–1747), was the son of former Albany mayor Dirck Wesselse Ten Broeck. His maternal grandparents were Abraham Cuyler (1665–1747), the brother of former Albany mayor Cornelis Cuyler, and Caatje (née Bleecker) Cuyler (1670–1734), a daughter of former Albany mayor Jan Jansen Bleecker.

Career

Abraham was sent to New York City to learn business with his sister Christina's husband, Philip Livingston. In 1751, at seventeen years old, he was sent to Europe to learn international business after his father's death, returning to Albany in 1752.

Ten Broeck increased his wealth via trade while in Albany. During the 1750s, he was involved in the provincial militia. In 1759, he was elected to the Albany City Council and in 1760, he was elected to the Province of New York Assembly while continuing to serve Albany.

In 1769, his brother-in-law died at age 27 and Ten Broeck was named co-administrator of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck,<ref name="ATBnni"/> a position he held until 1784 when his nephew, Stephen Van Rensselaer III, came of age.

American Revolution

Ten Broeck continued his military involvement and was named colonel of the Albany County militia in 1775. On June 25, 1778Template:Citation needed, he was named Brigadier General of the Tryon and Albany Counties of Militia and then Albany County only. He resigned March 26, 1781.

He was a member of the New York Provincial Congress from 1775 to 1777 and was its chairman of its Committee of Safety in 1777.

After war years

After the death of Mayor John Barclay, Ten Broeck was appointed Mayor of Albany in 1779, remaining in office until 1783. In March 1789, he ran for Congress but was defeated by Jeremiah Van Rensselaer. In 1796, Mayor Abraham Yates, Jr. died and Ten Broeck was again appointed Mayor of Albany, remaining in office until 1798 when he was succeeded by another nephew, Philip Schuyler Van Rensselaer (1767–1824).

Ten Broeck was a Federalist presidential elector in 1796, and cast his votes for John Adams and Thomas Pinckney.

Personal life

In November 1763, he married Elizabeth Van Rensselaer (1734–1813), a daughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer I (the 7th Patroon and 4th Lord of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck) and a sister of patroon Stephen Van Rensselaer II.

Elizabeth and her brother were great-grandchildren of the first native-born mayor of New York City, Stephanus Van Cortlandt. Together, they were the parents of five children, including:

By the mid-1760s, Ten Broeck was one of Albany's wealthiest men. The Ten Broecks lived in a house that was assessed equally with the Schuyler Mansion and Yates Mansion in 1788. In 1797, it was burned in a fire that destroyed several city blocks.<ref name="Fire">Fire at the New York State Museum web site.</ref> Construction was started on the new home soon after, and the family resided there beginning in 1798 calling the place "Prospect." The historic mansion still stands in Arbor Hill more than 200 years later.<ref name="Scheltema2013"></ref>

Ten Broeck died on Friday, January 19, 1810.<ref name="Munsell1854"></ref>

People of Albany

Abraham Ten Broeck by Stefan Bielinski


Abraham Ten Broeck was born in May 1734 - the eldest surviving son but a younger child of the large family of city father Dirck Ten Broeck and his wife Margarita Cuyler Ten Broeck.

Young Abraham was sent to New York City to learn business in the house of his brother-in-law, Philip Livingston. Following the death of his father in 1751, the seventeen-year-old was sent to Europe to learn about international business and to absorb continental culture. By 1752, he had returned home to stay - residing in the family home at Market and Columbia Streets with his widowed mother.

Capitalized by family assets, he prospered in trade - securing wood from upriver forests and cutting it into boards for export while importing a range of items to be sold from his riverside store. By the mid-1760s, he was one of the city's wealthiest businessmen with his Albany holdings including additional lots and buildings, storehouses, stables, a lumber yard, and the new dock on the north side of the city.

In 1759, Abraham Ten Broeck was elected to the Albany city council from the third ward. He served as assistant and alderman for many years even though he was elected to represent Rensselaerswyck in the provincial Assembly in 1760. He was re-elected and served until the Assembly was dissolved in 1775. During that time, he gained a reputation as a supporter of American rights over British prerogatives!

Ten Broeck at 30 by Thomas Mc Ilworth In 1763, he married Elizabeth Van Rensselaer - the only daughter of the Patroon. Their family of five children (born between 1765 and 1779) was smaller than most - perhaps due to the ages of the parents. All were baptized in the Albany Dutch church where Abraham and Elizabeth were prominent members.

Following the untimely death of his young brother-in-law in 1769, Abraham Ten Broeck was named CO-administrator of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck. He performed that service until his nephew, the young Patroon, came of age in 1784. Manor records show Ten Broeck was ambitious in signing up new tenants - who included overflow people from established early Albany families and a large number of recent émigrés as well. Many of these new leaseholders settled in the riverside area between the northern city line and the Manor House that came to be called "Watervliet."

Businessman, landlord, and local leader, and provincial representative, Abraham Ten Broeck also was an active leader in the provincial militia - holding commissions since the 1750s. Just forty at the outbreak of hostilities in 1775, he was colonel of the Albany County Militia that became the home-based military agent of the Crusade for American Liberties. He ultimately held the rank of Brigadier General of the New York State Militia.

Provincial Congresses the poilitical revolution

Military career military service during the Revolution

In 1779, he was appointed mayor of Albany on the death of John Barclay. He served until 1783 and again, following the death of Abraham Yates, Jr., from 1796 to 1798.

post war career post-war career to follow

For thirty years, Abraham Ten Broeck was a prominent resident of Albany's third ward. In 1788, his townhouse was assessed on a par with Schuyler and Yates Mansions - the three highest in the city. In 1790, that home was attended by twelve servants. Following the destruction of his Market Street home in the fire of 1797, he began building a grand mansion on Arbor Hill - which then was technically out of the city and a part of Watervliet. His family moved there in 1798. In 1800, his household was configured on the Watervliet census and still included ten slaves. For all of that time, he also owned substantial properties both in and out of the city.

He filed a will in March 1809. It left his substantial estate to his wife and then to their children and grandchildren.

Albany city father Abraham Ten Broeck died on January 19, 1810 in his seventy-sixth year. His widow died in 1813.


PAGE IN PROGRESS


notes

the people of colonial Albany The life of Abraham Ten Broeck is CAP biography number 6. This profile is derived chiefly from family and community-based resources. This important figure deserves a substantial biographical consideration. Until then, you might begin by following the historiography recommended in his Wikipedia article.

Siblings: Abraham Ten Broeck's mother gave birth to twelve children between 1715 and 1738. The marriages of Abraham and six of his siblings further connected the fourth generation of this one-time New Netherland family in regional circles.

This nifty obituary was printed in an Albany newspaper:

An older General Abraham Ten Broeck Died, Friday, Jan. 19, Gen. Abraham Ten Broeck, in the 76th year of his age. He was conspicuous for the ardent love of his country, in whose service he devoted his best days. His remains were buried with military honors, and attended by a large and very general concourse of his fellow-citizens.

He was descended from one of the most respectable Dutch families of the colony of New York. His father was for many years recorder and then mayor of the city of Albany. He commenced business in the city as a merchant, and was married in 1753 to the only sister of the Patroon, who survived him. He was called early into public life; was for many years a member of assembly under the colonial government, and at the commencement of the American war he entered upon the trying scenes of the revolution, with distinguished ardor and patriotism. He was colonel of the militia, member of the provincial congress of 1775, delegate to the state convention in 1776, of which he was made president. Early in the contest, he was appointed brigadier-general of the militia, by which appointment he had then under his command all the militia from Dutchess and Ulster, to the northern and western extremities of the state; and he rendered in that capacity zealous and meritorious services in the memorable campaign of 1777. He was a member in the state senate, mayor of the city, first judge of the court of common pleas, and president of the Albany Bank.

In all his various offices and public trusts, he acquitted himself well, without stain and without reproach. Such a series of meritorious services entitle this venerable patriot to live long in the recollection of his grateful country. His virtues in private life rose to a level with the excellence of his public character. He was a firm and devout believer in the gospel of our blessed Redeemer, and one of the brightest ornaments of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in this city. He closed a well-spent life in humble resignation, and retaining his senses to the last, died under the cheering Consolations of the gospel.

Entry at WikiTree

General Abraham Ten Broeck formerly Tenbroeck Born before 13 May 1734 in Albany County, New Yorkmap ANCESTORS ancestors Son of Dirck Ten Broeck and Grietje (Cuyler) ten Broeck Brother of Catharina (Ten Broeck) Livingston, Anna Tenbroeck, Christina Ten Broeck, Maria TenBroeck, Wessel Tenbroeck, Sara ten Broek, Abraham Ten Broeck, Margarita Tenbroeck, Dirck (Tenbroeck) Ten Broeck and Dirck Ten Broeck Husband of Elizabeth Van Rensselaer — married 1 Nov 1763 [location unknown] DESCENDANTS descendants Father of Dirck Tenbroeck, Elizabeth Tenbroeck, Elizabeth (Ten Broeck) Schuyler, Margareta Tenbroeck and Maria Van Rensselaer Tenbroeck Died 19 Jan 1810 in Albany, New York, United Statesmap Profile managers: New Netherland Settlers WikiTree private message [send private message] and Harold Lansing private message [send private message] Profile last modified 3 Jul 2018 | Created 10 Sep 2010 This page has been accessed 1,047 times. Categories: New York Provincial Committees of Safety | Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, New York | Albany, New York | New Netherland Descendants 1674-1776 | New Netherland Settlers Project Needs LNAB | New Netherland Main Profile | New York, American Revolution.

Brigadier General Abraham (Tenbroeck) Ten Broeck served New York during the American Revolution Service started: 1775 Unit(s): New York Militia at Saratoga Service ended: March 26, 1781 Contents [hide] 1 Biography 1.1 Name 1.2 Christening 1.3 Marriage 1.4 Revolutionary War Service 1.5 Death 1.6 Note 2 Sources Biography Name Name: Name: Abraham ten Broeck Christening Christening: Date: 13 May 1734 Place: Albany Dutch Reformed Church, New York Father: Dirck Ten Broeck Mother: Margarita Cuyler Source: 19 May 1734 Abraham, of Dirck Ten Broek and Margrieta Cuylder. Wit.: Abraham Cuylder, Jr., Catharina Ten Broek. [1] Marriage Marriage: Date: 1 Nov 1763 Place: Husband: Abraham ten Broeck Wife: Source: Revolutionary War Service TEN BROECK, ABRAHAM DAR Ancestor #: A113443 Service: NEW YORK Rank(s): BRIGADIER GENERAL Birth: 5-13-1734 ALBANY NEW YORK Death: 1-19-1810 ALBANY NEW YORK. SPOUSE: ELIZABETH VAN RENSSELAER. DAR Patriot Index accessed 9 June 2018. [2]

Death Death: Date: Place: Source: This person was created through the import of Rodney Timbrook Ancestors and Relatives_2010-09-10.ged on 10 September 2010. The following data was included in the gedcom. You may wish to edit it for readability.

@N1269@ NOTE: Brigadier General, present at the most critical moment in the battle of Bemis Heights. Additional military history: Helped draft the Militia Law. Brigadier General, first of Albany and Tryon County Militias, then of the Albany County Militia. Resigned in 1781 due to health problems. Other: Married 1 Nov 1763 (1753?), Elizabeth

Van Rensselaer (17 34-1813), daughter of Stephen Van Rensselaer. They had five children; one, a son, Dirck (d. 1832), m. 1785, Cornelia Stuyvesant (1768-1825) . The general was the first judge of the Albany County court : of common pleas and was mayor of Albany.

source: http://www.rootsweb.com/~nysarato/sarapkt.htm - Lineage Bo oks of the Charter Members of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Daughters of the American Revolution: (Washington, DC, various years) - Sanderson, Howard Kendall, compiler; "Lynn in the Revolution;" W .B. Clarke; (Boston, 1909)


Today, Arbor Hill is a general term referring to a large section of the city of Albany. At its most inclusive, Arbor Hill extends West from North Pearl Street for several blocks beyond Henry Johnson (Northern) Boulevard. It is bounded on the South by Sheridan Hollow (Sherman and Elk Streets, Sheridan Avenue [Fox Street], and perhaps Orange Street). It extends North to "Tivoli Hollow."

Generally speaking, most people think of Arbor Hill as the elevated parts on the North Side of Albany from Foxes Arbor Hill in 1790 Creek to Patroon's Creek. Two hundred years ago, it encompassed a somewhat more tightly defined portion of the city.

In 1763, the city council deeded lots on the North side of Foxes Creek to a number of bidders. That tract was known as the Woutenbergh. In September and October 1787, a number of those deeds were renewed while others reverted to the city for non payment of taxes. They then were re-sold.

The developer's version of the city map made by Simeon De Witt in 1790 was the first to identify Arbor Hill. That plan showed Arbor Hill's eastern boundary as Barrack (Chapel) Street, Orange Street on the South, the northern city line along Patroon (Clinton Avenue) Street, and West - about half way to the end of the block ending at Hawk Street. All that land would have been on the North Side of Foxes Creek. By 1792, the plot had been gridded out for development and lots were sold to Dinnah Jackson and others.

After the fire of 1793 destroyed his townhouse, General Abraham Ten Broeck built the Georgian mansion also known as "Arbor Hill" on the hill - above the river and between North Albany's two major streambeds. It stands today as the home of the Albany County Historical Association.

The History of the Mansion The Ten Broeck Mansion was built in 1797 - 98 for Abraham Ten Broeck and his wife, Elizabeth Van Rensselaer after a fire destroyed their Albany city home. On five acres in the township of Watervliet leased from his brother-in-law, the patroon Stephen Van Rensselaer, General TenBroeck built a Federal-style house with sloping lawns and formal gardens.Named "Prospect," the mansion commanded a sweeping view o f the Hudson Riverand the daily traffic of barges and schooners along the busy trade route. The Ten Broecks were already five generations into new world residence by the time Abraham came of age and had become prosperous and prominent in public affairs. Ten Broeck served as a delegate to the Second Continental Congress in 1775. In 1777, as Brigadier General, he commanded the New York militia at the famous battle of Saratoga. From 1779-1783 he served as bot h mayor of the city of Albany and as a member of the New York State Senate. Governor George Clinton appointed Ten Broeck first Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in 1781. Among his other accomplishments were serving as the first president of the Bank of Albany, the first president of the Albany Public Library, and a trustee of Union College.

Ten Broeck enjoyed Prospect for a scant twelve years before his death in 1810. His widow, Elizabeth, lived there another three years until her death in 1813. Over the next thirty years the character of the house changed as it was refurbished and renovated in the then-fashionable Greek Revival style. Theodore Olcott purchased the residence in 1848 and renamed it Arbor Hill after the surrounding area. The Olcott family, one of the most prominent of Albany families in banking and civic improvements, was responsible for the addition of the first floor butler's pantry and the second floor bathrooms, both of which reflect the Victorian style of the late 19th century. The Mansion's dominance spurred new development in Arbor Hill, with anew wealthy merchant class building homes near their businesses in the late Greek Revival, Italianate, Second Empire, and other styles from the late 1840's to 1890. After one hundred years of Olcott family ownership, the heirs of Robert Olcott presented the house to the Albany County Historical Association in 1948.

Ten Broeck Mansion

9 Ten Broeck Place - Albany - Albany County Federal brick residence built 1797 -98 for Abraham Ten Broeck, prominent Albanian, delegate to Continental Congress, mayor of Albany, and brigadier general in American Revolution; design at tributed to Philip Hooker. Operated as house museum by Albany County Historical Association. Source: http://www.hvnet.com/tou Sources Find A Grave Memorial# 5787888 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=5787888 Bogert, Secretary Henry L. Year Book of the Holland Society of New York. New York: Knickerbocker Press, New York, 1906. Rensselaerswyck series Dutch West India Company The Patroon System Map of Rensselaerswyck Patroons of Rensselaerswyck:

Kiliaen van Rensselaer (1630–40s) Various (1640s–52) Jan Baptist van Rensselaer (1652–58) Jeremias van Rensselaer (1658–74) Kiliaen van Rensselaer (1674–87) Kiliaen van Rensselaer (1687–1719)[1] Jeremias van Rensselaer (1719–45) Stephen van Rensselaer I (1745–47) Stephen van Rensselaer II (1747–69) Abraham Ten Broeck (1769–84, de facto) Stephen van Rensselaer III (1784–1839) On a white background, three black glyphs appear, aligned vertically and connected along one vertical line which shares at least one line within each glyph except for the bottom one. On top is the number 4, written with the top closed. Its horizontal line extends to the right and is intercepted by a vertical line making a cross. Its vertical line continues below to form the vertical line of a letter R. That line continues down to connect to a letter W, which is written like two letters V crossing each other. The vertical line connects to this intersection point.

Wikipedia Abraham Ten Broeck (May 13, 1734 [citation needed] – January 19, 1810[2]) was a New York politician, businessman, and militia Brigadier General of Dutch descent. He was twice Mayor of Albany, New York and built one of the largest mansions in the area that still stands more than 200 years later. Contents 1 Early life 2 American Revolution 3 After war years 4 References

Early life Abraham Ten Broeck was the son of Dirck Ten Broeck and Margarita Cuyler. His great-grandfathers included former Albany mayors Dirck Wesselse Ten Broeck and Jan Jansen Bleecker. His father was a politician and also served as Albany's mayor beginning in 1746. Abraham was sent to New York City to learn business with his sister Christina's husband, Philip Livingston. He was then sent to Europe to learn international business after his father's death in 1751, returning to Albany in 1752.

Ten Broeck increased his wealth via trade while in Albany. During the 1750s, he was involved in the provincial militia. In 1759, he was elected to the city council and in 1760, he was elected to the Province of New York Assembly while continuing to serve Albany. In November[3] 1763, he married Elizabeth Van Rensselaer, a sister of patroon Stephen Van Rensselaer II and great-granddaughter of the first native-born mayor of New York City, Stephanus Van Cortlandt. By the mid-1760s, Ten Broeck was one of Albany's wealthiest men. In 1769, his brother-in-law died at age 27 and Ten Broeck was named co-administrator of the Manor of Rensselaerswyck, a position he held until 1784 when his nephew, Stephen Van Rensselaer III, came of age. American Revolution

Ten Broeck continued his military involvement and was named colonel of the Albany County militia in 1775. On June 25, 1778 [citation needed], he was named Brigadier General of the Tryon and Albany Counties of Militia and then Albany County only. He resigned March 26, 1781[citation needed].

He was a member of the New York Provincial Congress from 1775 to 1777 and was its chairman of its Committee of Safety in 1777. After war years

After the death of Mayor John Barclay, Ten Broeck was appointed Mayor of Albany in 1779, remaining in office until 1783. In March 1789, he ran for Congress but was defeated by Jeremiah Van Rensselaer. In 1796, Mayor Abraham Yates died and Ten Broeck was again appointed Mayor of Albany, remaining in office until 1798. Ten Broeck was a Federalist presidential elector in 1796, and cast his votes for John Adams and Thomas Pinckney.

The Ten Broecks lived in a house that was assessed equally with the Schuyler Mansion and Yates Mansion in 1788. In 1797, it was burned in a fire that destroyed several city blocks.[4] Construction was started on the new Ten Broeck Mansion soon after and the family resided there beginning in 1798. The historic mansion still stands in Arbor Hill more than 200 years later.

↑ Records of the Albany Dutch Reformed Church(1683-1809), Part 3, Page 53. Baptismal Record ↑ http://services.dar.org/Public/DAR_Research/search_adb/default.cfm accessed 9 June 2018.

See also

References

External links