Eli Foote

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Eli Foote,6 (Daniel,5 Nathaniel,4,3,2,1): Eli Foote was born at ___ 30 Oct., 1747 to Daniel Foote and Parsons.

He died at North Carolina ;

He married at ___ Roxanna Ward, daughter of [Foot Fam;1;48] Roxana Ward Beecher (Foote) Daughter of Eli Foote and Roxanna Foote Born, September 10, 1775, Guilford, New Haven, Connecticut, United States Died September 24, 1816 in Litchfield, Litchfield, Connecticut, Cause of death: Consumption or Tuberculosis. Buried: Litchfield, Connecticut. Wife of (Reverend) Lyman Beecher Mother of Catharine Esther Beecher; William Henry Beecher; Edward Beecher; Mary Perkins; George Beecher and 3 others

Sister of Harriet Foote; Andrew Ward Foote; William Henry Foote; Martha Foote; John Parsons Foote and 4 others. Occupation: Millworker

Search NCpedia This article is from the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, 6 volumes, edited by William S. Powell. Copyright ©1979-1996 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. For personal use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher.

Foote, Eli by T. C. Parramore, 1986 30 Oct. 1747–9 Sept. 1792

Eli Foote, merchant, was born in Colchester, Conn. the son of Daniel and Margaret Parsons Foote. Educated for the practice of law, Foote was the only Tory in a large family of Whigs during the American Revolution. His wife, Roxana, was the daughter of General Andrew Ward, a renowned patriot. Bereft of influence and the opportunity for professional advancement at the close of the war, Eli sought a livelihood for himself, his wife, and their six children in maritime commerce at Guilford, Conn. Failing in an enterprise involving the building of a ship for seagoing trade, he became a partner of his brother, Justin Foote, on a trading voyage to North Carolina in 1789. The pair took up winter quarters at Murfreesboro, a village that had been incorporated and laid out only in the preceding year. Owners of a schooner, the Foote brothers began to develop a three-cornered trade involving North Carolina farm produce and naval stores exchanged for New England and West Indian goods. Eli established residence at Winton, on the Chowan River ten miles below Murfreesboro, which is located on the Meherrin River, an arm of the Chowan.

"Roxana (Ward) Foote, grandmother of Henry Ward Beecher." Silhouette. Andrew Warde and his descendants, 1597-1910 : being a compilation of facts relating to one of the oldest New England families and embracing many families of other names, descended from a worthy ancestor even unto the tenth and eleventh generations. New York: A.T. De La Mare Printing and Publishing Company. 1910. Facing 132. "Roxana (Ward) Foote, grandmother of Henry Ward Beecher." Silhouette. Andrew Warde and his descendants, 1597-1910 : being a compilation of facts relating to one of the oldest New England families and embracing many families of other names, descended from a worthy ancestor even unto the tenth and eleventh generations. New York: A.T. De La Mare Printing and Publishing Company. 1910. Facing 132. Between 1789 and 1792 the Footes sponsored several trading voyages to Martinique, St. Croix, St. Martin's, and St. Eustatius. Their Murfreesboro warehouse was packed with articles of commerce when, on the night of 17 Apr. 1791, they became victims of Murfreesboro's first crime of record. Thieves broke into the warehouse and made off with chintz, linen, silk, and other goods. Most of the stolen merchandise was recovered the next day, but the responsibility of prosecuting the thieves fell to Eli, who found it necessary to remain in North Carolina during the following summer to testify against them. In August 1792 he contracted yellow fever, dying in delirium at Winton. His gravestone, which still stands at Winton, lists the date of his death as August 1791 and his age as fifty-five (he was actually forty-four). The reason for the errors is that his gravestone was not erected until 1822 by order of the will of General Joseph F. Dickinson, in whose family cemetery Foote had been buried. Justin Foote, in company with John P. Foote, Eli's son, continued in seasonal commerce in the Albemarle Sound area for more than a quarter of a century after Eli's death.

The ten children who survived the death of Eli Foote included his daughter Roxana who, in 1799, married the Reverend Lyman Beecher and became the mother of Harriet Beecher Stowe. It may have been the family's acquaintance with the Albemarle region that led Mrs. Stowe to use it as the locale for one of her novels, Dred: A Tale of the Dismal Swamp (1856).

References:

Nathaniel Goodwin, The Foote Family; Or, the Descendants of Nathaniel Foote. . . . (1849).

T. C. Parramore, "The Merchants Foote," North Carolina Historical Review 46 (1969).

Will of Joseph F. Dickerson and Deed books of Hertford County (North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh).

Additional Resources:

Beecher, Lyman. Autobiography, correspondence, Etc. of Lyman Beecher, D.D. vol. 1. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1865. 53-54. http://books.google.com/books?id=c4pKAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA53#v=onepage&q&f=false (accessed February 28, 2014).

Cunningham, Edith Perkins. Owls Nest: A Tribute to Sarah Elliott Perkins. Printed at the Riverside Press for private distribution, 1907. 51. http://books.google.com/books?id=jHAaAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA51#v=onepage&q&f=false (accessed February 28, 2014).

Ward, George K. Andrew Warde and his descendants, 1597-1910 : being a compilation of facts relating to one of the oldest New England families and embracing many families of other names, descended from a worthy ancestor even unto the tenth and eleventh generations. New York: A.T. De La Mare Printing and Publishing Company. 1910. 132, 488, 491. http://archive.org/stream/andrewwardehisde00ward#page/132/mode/2up (accessed February 28, 2014).

Image Credits:

"Roxana (Ward) Foote, grandmother of Henry Ward Beecher." Silhouette. Andrew Warde and his descendants, 1597-1910 : being a compilation of facts relating to one of the oldest New England families and embracing many families of other names, descended from a worthy ancestor even unto the tenth and eleventh generations. New York: A.T. De La Mare Printing and Publishing Company. 1910. Facing 132. http://archive.org/stream/andrewwardehisde00ward#page/132/mode/2up (accessed February 28, 2014).

Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press. 1 January 1986 | Parramore, T. C.

State Library of North Carolina NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources NC LIVE Institute of Museum and Library Services


JUDGE EBENEZER FOOTE.* (*We are Indebted for the facts embodied in this sketch to a memorial volume concerning Samuel E. Foote in which there is an appendix giving the principal events in the life of Ebenezer Foote; also to an obituary notice by General Henry Leavenworth printed in the Delaware Gazette December 28, 1829, and to memoranda furnished by Miss Foote of Delhi, the great-great-granddaughter of Judge Foote). Judge Foote was born April 12, 1756, in Colchester, Connecticut. He was the son of Daniel Foote and the brother of Eli Foote whose daughter Roxana married Rev. Lyman Beecher and was the mother of Henry Ward Beecher, Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe, and others of that talented family. Some of the Foote family espoused the loyalist cause in the Revolutionary war; but Ebenezer was an ardent patriot, and when the first guns were fired be, with several other young men, fled from, home without his father's permission and joined the patriotic troops near Boston. He was present at the battle of Bunker Hill and served continuously until the close of the war. For his bravery and efficiency he was promoted from the ranks in which he enlisted to the position of Major. He attracted the attention of Washington and was by him assigned to staff duty.


https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/17148550/eli-foote

Eli Foote was born in Colchester, Connecticut, a descendant of Nathaniel Foote who settled in Wethersfield, Connecticut in 1640. Eli was trained to be a lawyer but eventually became a merchant in Guilford, trading goods originating in the West Indies. He was a Tory and Episcopalian, but was tolerated by his Patriot friends and family during the Revolutionary War. He was learned and gifted in story telling. Part of the "St. Pumpkin's Day Ode," which he wrote in 1777 to amuse his friends goes like this:

"On this great day I mean to dine On roasted goose and mutton fine To drink a toast to George our King And pray that Rebels soon may swing. If tired with gloomy cares or sick Of all the pleasures of East Creek Your Toryship will condescend To bring your wife and see your friend. To what my table does afford You shall be welcome as a Lord."

Eli married Roxanna Ward on October 11, 1772, and they had 10 children. He died of yellow fever on September 8, 1792 in Winton, North Carolina, where he was trying to secure the prosecution of thieves who had broken into his business there and stolen a considerable portion of his inventory. His widow Roxanna and their 10 children were left penniless and went to live with her father, General Andrew Ward, a Revolutionary War officer. His name is recorded on a monument erected in the Foote-Ward Cemetery in Guilford, Connecticut, where his wife and many of his children were buried.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/52033114/eli-foote